Thunderbirds are Go! – vehicles, 1, 2, 3, 4, and S

Back in the mid-1960s, there was a show called Thunderbirds. This was a marionette type show about a family of pilots who flew around in fantastical machines to save the day. Move to 2015, and we get an updated version of the show. It is created in CGI, but the charm of the marionette type filming still exists. I was able to see the show as a part of Amazon. I loved it instantly, and watched every episode. I am glad that they are coming out with a second season. Even more impressive was when toys started to show up on the shelves of Toys R Us a few weeks back. I feel like I have a finger on the pulse of the toy industry, but occasionally I get surprised, and this was a nice surprise.

Thunderbirds 1, 2, 4, and S all have buttons or twists. One is for sounds with pilots and mechanical sounds for that vehicle. There is also a moving gimmick of some sort.

Thunderbird 1 has a button for sound. The engines twist to rotate the wings out. There is not a lot that Thunderbird 1 does in the toy, since there is not a lot it does in the show either with the exception of an opening bay door and a grappling hook.

The details are really well done, with nice panel lines and details on the engines.

Thunderbird 2 has the most going on. It comes with Thunderbird 4 in the single set as well. This behemoth is the heavy transport of the team. It sits low to the ground on wheels that roll. The wings fold down when it is ready for takeoff.

The details on this one are amazing. They look good on 1, but 2 has a lot more going on. The back end with the engines looks amazing.

Getting into the gimmicks, we have to look at the legs first. These fold down from the body when a button is pushed on either side. That is three buttons so far, including the sound button.

Once the legs are down, the 4th button is pressed and the cargo hold from the center of the ship is released. It drops to the tarmac and the front door can be folded down to release the cargo, or in this case, Thunderbird 4.

Thunderbird 4 does not have any sounds or gimmicks. It is too small for any of that. The details on the submarine are really well done though.

Thunderbird 3 is the space faring vessel. The grey center part can rotate to make the sounds of the engines, grappling arms, as well as the countdown to takeoff.

When the engine is pressed on the bottom, the three arms are released around the body. There are further arm joints that can be moved by hand.

This 4-pack is outstanding. I am really glad I saw it as opposed to getting each individually. This is one team that is greater than the sum of their parts. Each ship has a use, and they make a great team.

For us in the US, we are getting Thunderbirds Are Go! through Amazon. The first season for us was only 12 episodes, so we did not even get to the episodes in the original first season that showed the Thunderbird Shadow, or Thunderbird S.

This vehicle is piloted by Kayo, the spy friend of the team. This is less of a rescue vehicle compared to the rest of the International Rescue team.

The jet has a great futuristic and stealth look. It has front-swept wings and long engines that are connected with a tail. In my research for this vehicle I found it was designed by Shoji Kawamori, who is known for his designs of Macross jets. Unsurprising, he is also the designer of many Diaclone figures that turned into Transformers. Any resemblance to Cyclonus? Oh yes there is!

There are two buttons. One is for sound. The second is to releases a motorcycle. Two vehicles in one.

The size of the Thunderbirds is great. They are not to big, or too small. They fit in fairly well with the Deluxe scale of some of the Transformers. Some of the Transformers vehicles fit right in.

Thunderbird S looks like Cyclonus. Thunderbird 2 looks like Scourge. Didn’t they want to give any props to the Autobots?

I will definitely be keeping my eyes out for more of these guys in the future. They are a lot of fun, and now I am off to watch the second season, just released on Amazon.

 

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